Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Oxford - Magdalen College ...

... Magdalen's Perpendicular Gothic Great Tower/Bell Tower (1492-1505),
the tallest medieval tower in Oxford (144 feet high) ...
  
... amusing modern sculptures adorn the top of the Great Tower ...
source: sacred-destinations.com

     
... the most elaborate display of grotesques is found at the Magdalen
College. Unfortunately, much of the original grotesque art work
eroded away under the forces of nature. "Oxford's prevailing
south-west winds used to bring the sulphurous fumes from
the Gas Works" which ate away at the Magdalen carvings ...
source: cwrl.utexas.edu
  
... Gargoyles and Grotesques ...
... what exists today is merely medievalist, the attempt to create
medieval work: Between 1977 and 1981  Pat Coloney, Percy Quick, 
and Michael Groser begin renovation by “replac[ing]…heads [of the
high carving with] senior and long-serving members of the College” ... 
source: cwrl.utexas.edu
  
... Magdalen College side entrance (1845) ...
... a beautiful statue of Mary Magdalene presides over the college gate ...
source: sacred-destinations.com
      
... Victorian Gothic St Swithun buildings - High Street façade ...
  
... stone pulpit from which the anniversary sermon on the
festival of St John the Baptist, was formerly preached ...
source: oxford university and city guide
  
... the entrance of the Chaplain's Quadrangle ...
  
... the small Chaplain's Quad - contemporary grotesques wearing a tie  ...
... many people wrongly assume that all of Oxford's grotesques are old,
this is not the case many depict people from the University and 
a number are fine contemporary sculptures that work within 
and have become a part of a long tradition within our city ...
source: Martin Beek
   
... view across St. John's Quad to the President's Lodgings ...
  
... the Old Grammar Hall ...
... the surviving part is dated 1614; the bell turret was restored in
1828 and there was a further restoration on the South in 1849 ...
source: britishlistedbuildings.co.uk
  
 by en.wikipedia.org
... is popularly grown as an ornamental tree in temperate
regions all across the world because of the aesthetic appeal
of its flowers, leaves and seed pods.
EN: Goldenrain tree, varnish tree, Pride of India, China tree
NL: gele zeepboom, lampionboom, koelruit of blazenboom
DE: Rispiger Blasenbaum - FR: savonnier
  
... St. Swithun's Buildings and Quadrangle were built 
by Bodley and Garner. They are distinguished examples
of Victorian Gothic, balancing and complementing
the 15th century buildings ...
source: Rena Gardiner
  
... the Chapel porch ...
... in the 17th century the porch was given a classical style
doorway, but the original Gothic arch was restored in 1902 ...
source: britishlistedbuildings.co.uk
  
... entrance to the Great Quadrangle, the original and still the main
center of the college, is through the impressive Founder's Tower on
the east side of St. John's Quad. This Perpendicular Gothic gatehouse
is richly decorated with buttresses, pinnacles, carvings and moldings,
demonstrating the luxurious architectural tastes of Edward IV's reign
(1461-83). The vault underneath features splendid carved bosses ... 
   source: sacred-destinations.com 
    
... cloister corridor ...
  
... unlike any other Oxford college, the Great Quad (1474-80)
in Magdalen is encompassed entirely by a cloister,
giving the college a strong sense of monastic seclusion ..
source: sacred-destinations.com
  
... the Great Quad, looking west to the Founder's Tower (c.1480) ...
        
... the 'gargels', the grotesque figures on the buttresses, 
which were added in 1508-9 ...
source: Rena Gardiner
... the following description of the carvings is abriged from a 
manuscript in the Library: "beginning from the South-west corner,
the first two figures are the Lion and the Pelican.
The former of these is the emblem of Courage and Vigilance,
the latter of Parental Tenderness and Affection: both of them 
the complete character of a good Governor of a College ...
source: oxford university and city guide 
    
     
 ... inside the cloister's walkway ... 
  
... the most extraordinary collection of grotesques at Magdalen
exists in the cloisters.  These 22 grotesque carvings are best 
known as the “hieroglyphicals” which antiquarian William Stukley 
described as “‘whimsical figures’ which ‘amuse the vulgar’”. 
source: cwrl.utexas.edu
  
... in a credible interpretation Dr. William Reeks decided that 
“they represented various virtues and vices connected 
with the academic life”. These 22 grotesques symbolize
both the evil and good choices present in academia ...
source: cwrl.utexas.edu
   
... grisaille glass in the antechapel ...
  
... the Old Kitchen (15th century) ...
... the North part may retain part of the original
hospital buildings of circa 1300 ...
source: britishlistedbuildings.co.uk
  

... Grand Challenge Cup Henley, 1919
Grand Challenge Cup Henley, 1921
Magdalen College Womens in Torpid, 1991 ...
  

   ... Cloisters VII ...
  

... arch-doorway ... 
   


... the New Building (1733) and New Building Lawn ...
  

... Magdalen Plane ...
... this tree planted in 1801 is a scion of the hybrid
plane first raised in the Botanic Garden in 1666 ...
source: info board

  

... view on the Great Tower outside the Cloisters Quad ...
  

... impassive, sententious or cackling with glee at human foibles
safe from were they are perched, like bats under the eaves, 
are the grotesques and gargoyles of Oxford. 
Wherever you go about the Quadrangles, beaming down on you 
with little benevolence and a good deal of mischief, 
are gaggles of petrified miniature terribilità, scorn and ribaldry ...
source: david alston 

... Magdalen College ...
... pronounced "Maudlin" and founded by William of Waynflete
during the Wars of the Roses in 1458, Magdalen College has 100 acres
of grounds, more than a mile of riverside walks, and a herd of deer ...
source: www.chem.ox.ac.uk
 
by en.wikipedia.org
... the large, square Magdalen Tower is a famous Oxford landmark ...

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