Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Sachsenhausen ...

... Sachsenhausen Memorial and Museum ...

... perimeter watchtower ...

... and Prisoners' Camp wall ...

... Tower A - entrance to the Prisoners' Camp ...

... Sachsenhausen National Memorial (1961) ...
... view on wall around Appellplatz / Roll Call Area
indicating
positions of barrack blocks ...

... the entrance gate is mounted with
the inscription 'Work will set you free' ...

... recreation of the security perimeter ...

... stones indicating positions of barrack 29 and 30,
one of the perimeter watchtowers in distance...

... view on barracks 38 and 39, the small camp ...
... wall indicating positions of barrack blocks ...

... Tower A - entrance viewed from the Memorial ...

... prisoners' laundry room / meeting room, Soviet
Liberation Memorial and site of the Gallows ...


... prison cell ...

... a small bunch of local wild flowers, in
barrack 39,
to commemorate the prisoners
...
... barracks 38 and 39 describes the everyday life
of prisoners at Sachsenhausen ...

... Orientation on the area of the Memorial
and Museum Sachsenhausen ...

... the Museum and Memorial encompass only around
10 percent of the old concentration camp ...


by stiftung-bg.de
... History - Map - Exhibitions ...

First they came ... by Reverend Martin Niemöller,
a critic of the Nazis ,
was a prisoner at Sachsenhausen.


"THEY CAME FIRST for the Communists,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist.

THEN THEY CAME for the Jews,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew.

THEN THEY CAME for the trade unionists,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist.

THEN THEY CAME for me
and by that time no one was left to speak up."

First they came... ... (EN)
by en.wikipedia.org
Martin Niemöller's poem is well-known, frequently quoted, and is
a popular model for describing the dangers of political apathy,
as it often begins with specific and targeted fear and hatred
which soon escalates out of control ...

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